3. We Have Seen Jesus' Glory


Audio(31:30)

Ilja Jefimowitsch Repin, 'Raising of Jairus' Daughter' (1871), State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Ilja Jefimowitsch Repin, "Raising of Jairus' Daughter" (1871), State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

John the Apostle, an eyewitness of Jesus' life and ministry wrote:

"The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth." (John 1:14)

In this lesson we will explore the sense in which have the disciples saw hints of his glory? In what way do we see his glory today?

The Glory of Christ

Christ's Preexistent Glory

It is pretty clear from Scripture that Jesus' glory did not begin at his birth or his resurrection -- though, as we'll see below, his glory broke out on those occasions. Jesus' glory preceded time itself. In his great High Priestly Prayer, Jesus speaks to his Father:

"I have brought you glory on earth by completing the work you gave me to do. And now, Father, glorify me in your presence with the glory I had with you before the world began." (John 17:4-5)

John makes it clear that Christ's origins (if you can call them that) are "in the beginning with God."

" 1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2  He was in the beginning with God. 3  All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. 4  In him was life, and the life was the light of men. 5  The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it." (John 1:1-5)

The Apostle Paul concurs.

"He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For by him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together." (Colossians 1:15-17)

Christ is the Co-Creator of all (Hebrews 1-2:3). He brought the light of the Glorious Kingdom to dark earth, and set it ablaze. (There's a strong emphasis in both John's Gospel and Paul's writings of light vs. darkness. For more on that see Appendix 2. The Bible Theme of Light vs. Darkness).

Q1. (John 1:1-5, 14) When did Jesus glory and kingly authority have their origins? In what sense were they hidden while he was on earth? In what sense were they still present?
http://www.joyfulheart.com/forums/topic/1702-q1-beginnings/

Glory in Messianic Prophecy

The prophets had a glimpse of this glory. John observes, "Isaiah ... saw Jesus' glory and spoke about him" (John 12:41). One of the great messianic passages of the Old Testament begins with Isaiah declaring the glory of the coming Messiah:

"In the past he humbled the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali,
but in the future he will honor Galilee of the Gentiles....

The people walking in darkness have seen a great light;
on those living in the land of the shadow of death a light has dawned....

For to us a child is born, to us a son is given,
and the government will be on his shoulders.
And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,
Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.
Of the increase of his government and peace there will be no end.
He will reign on David's throne and over his kingdom,
establishing and upholding it with justice and righteousness
from that time on and forever.
The zeal of the LORD Almighty will accomplish this." (Isaiah 9:2, 6-7)

Glory on the Bethlehem Hillside (Luke 2:8-9)

This glorious light Isaiah spoke of begins in Bethlehem of Judah, and then progresses north to Galilee where Jesus resides and conducts much of his ministry.

"And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby,
keeping watch over their flocks at night.
An angel of the Lord appeared to them,
and the glory of the Lord shone around them,
and they were terrified." (Luke 2:8-9)

It was as if heaven is casting a great beacon of glory upon the dark hillside, and suddenly in its brilliance, the shepherds hear the angel's proclamation of a Savior, Christ the Lord, followed by an angel chorus singing, "Glory to God in the highest...."

Transfigured Glory

It is pretty easy to see the glory of the Glorious Kingdom shining through at Jesus' transfiguration on a high mountain before Peter, James, and John.

"There he was transfigured before them. His face shone like the sun, and his clothes became as white as the light. Just then there appeared before them Moses and Elijah, talking with Jesus.... While he was still speaking, a bright cloud enveloped them, and a voice from the cloud said, 'This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased. Listen to him!'" (Matthew 17:2-3, 5)

Even Moses and Elijah glow: "Moses and Elijah, 31  appeared in glorious splendor, talking with Jesus" (Luke 9:31). The disciples did not know what to say, and muttered about setting up three shrines.

Decades later, Peter vividly recalls that amazing day. He writes,

"We did not follow cleverly invented stories when we told you about the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of his majesty. For he received honor and glory from God the Father when the voice came to him from the Majestic Glory, saying, 'This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.' We ourselves heard this voice that came from heaven when we were with him on the sacred mountain." (2 Peter 1:16-18)

Glory in Jesus' Miracles

The first major miracle recorded in the Gospel of John -- which has a theme of glory running through it -- is the Turning of Water into Wine (John 2:1-10). After he tells the story, John observes:

"This, the first of his miraculous signs,[43] Jesus performed at Cana in Galilee. He thus revealed[44] his glory, and his disciples put their faith in him." (John 2:11)

John relates another explicit evidence of the glory of God peeking out through the ministry of Jesus in the raising of Lazarus. When their brother Lazarus falls seriously ill, Mary and Martha send word to Jesus, who is about two days' journey away. John records:

"When he heard this, Jesus said, 'This sickness will not end in death. No, it is for God's glory so that God's Son may be glorified through it.'" (John 11:2-4)

Later, when Lazarus comes out of the tomb alive, Jesus says, "I told you so."

"Did I not tell you that if you believed, you would see the glory of God?" (John 11:40)

Here, the event both brings glory to God (reputation glory), and allows them a glimpse into the glory of God in Jesus' Person (inherent glory).

Think about this with me. Prior to this, Jesus' glory was inherently present, but wasn't visible to those around him. But when Jesus turned the water into wine, suddenly people saw the power of God, and said, "Ah...." What is this? When Jesus calmed the storm, Matthew records,

"The men were amazed and asked, 'What kind of man is this? Even the winds and the waves obey him!'" (Matthew 8:27)

When we humans see something extraordinary, it gets our attention. It might even inspire some level of faith, even if it is not mature faith.

The extraordinary is often a direct intervention of God into our world. As I will develop further in Lesson 5, as we listen to God and do what he shows us, we will be participants in many of these God-moments, and people will get a glimpse of the glory of God in and through us. In a dark world, even a little bit of light that you or I might have, looks very bright indeed.

There's a song that I learned many years ago, a Negro spiritual, I believe.

Come and go with me to my Father's house,
To my Father's house, to my Father's house.
Come and go with me to my Father's house,
There'll be joy, joy, joy.

My mental picture is following the singer to the Father's house along a dark road, but at a bend in the road, the house becomes visible, with light bursting out of its doors and windows. And I am invited.

Jesus comes from the Father's house, and brings with him the glory that keeps shining out, again and again, throughout his ministry. His enemies try to explain away the light and call it darkness, the work of Beelzebub. But his followers are dazzled by it, and over time become faithful disciples.

Like moths to a light, so men are irresistibly attracted to Christ's light. Oh, they may reject it and explain it away. But Christ's light is inherently attractive.[45] If you've studied the growth of the Christian Movement internationally in the last half of the twentieth century and the beginning of our own, then you know that a primary impetus for this growth is evangelism conducted in the presence of signs and wonders. This is especially true through such evangelists as T.L. Osborn (1923-2013), and great Holy Spirit movements in Korea, China, and South America.

Q2. How is Jesus' glory displayed through his transfiguration and miracles?
http://www.joyfulheart.com/forums/topic/1703-q2-glory-displayed/

The Father as the Source of the Son's Glory

The theme of Christ's glory and glorification is strong in the Gospel of John.[46] Jesus plainly acknowledges that his glory comes directly from his Father, a fact that he does not hide from those who listen to his teachings. He is open about the Glorious Kingdom he comes from.

To his opponents, the Jewish leaders: "I honor my Father and you dishonor me. I am not seeking glory for myself; but there is one who seeks it, and he is the judge." (John 8:49-50)

"If I glorify myself, my glory means nothing. My Father, whom you claim as your God, is the one who glorifies me." (John 8:54)

Nearing Holy Week as Jesus talks about his resurrection: "'Father, glorify your name!' Then a voice came from heaven, 'I have glorified it, and will glorify it again.' The crowd that was there and heard it said it had thundered; others said an angel had spoken to him." (John 12:28-29)

Of the Holy Spirit, the Paraclete: "He will bring glory to me by taking from what is mine and making it known to you." (John 16:14)

The High Priestly Prayer in John 17: "After Jesus said this, he looked toward heaven and prayed: 'Father, the time has come. Glorify your Son, that your Son may glorify you.'" (John 17:1)

"I have brought you glory on earth by completing the work you gave me to do.
5  And now, Father, glorify me in your presence with the glory I had with you before the world began." (John 17:4-5)

Glory is particularly associated with the Son of Man because of the passage in Daniel:

"One like a son of man ... was given authority, glory and sovereign power." (Daniel 7:13-14)

We see this theme especially in the Synoptic Gospels:

"For the Son of Man is going to come in his Father's glory with his angels...." (Matthew 16:27)

"They will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of the sky, with power and great glory." (Matthew 24:30b)

"When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, he will sit on his throne in heavenly glory." (Matthew 25:31)

"When [Judas] was gone, Jesus said, 'Now is the Son of Man glorified[47] and God is glorified in him. If God is glorified in him, God will glorify the Son in himself, and will glorify him at once.'" (John 13:31-32)

Glory Anticipated by Followers

James and John naively looked forward to this Glorious Kingdom.

"Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory." (Mark 10:37)

They did not know that the glory is accompanied by suffering. Paul writes,

"Now if we are children, then we are heirs -- heirs of God and co-heirs with Christ, if indeed we share in his sufferings in order that we may also share in his glory." (Romans 8:17)

As we will discuss shortly, even one of the thieves crucified beside him anticipated the time Jesus would reign in glory (Luke 23:39-43).

Jesus' Glory at the Cross

The cross especially -- along with Jesus' subsequent resurrection and ascension -- are seen throughout John's Gospel as the means of his glorification,[48] signs of the redemptive purpose of this Glorious Kingdom.

Probably Jesus understood the combination of glory with suffering through a verse from the great Suffering Servant passage from Isaiah that combines his suffering with his glory. In the Greek Septuagint translation it uses the same Greek words that John is using to express the concept.

"See, my servant will act wisely;
he will be raised and lifted up (hypsoō) and highly[49] exalted (doxazō)."
(Isaiah 52:13)[50]

Jesus echoes these words in his three statements about being lifted up:

"Just as Moses lifted up (hypsoō) the snake in the desert, so the Son of Man must be lifted up (hypsoō),  that everyone who believes in him may have eternal life." (John 3:14-15)

"When you have lifted up (hypsoō) the Son of Man, then you will know that I am [the one I claim to be] and that I do nothing on my own but speak just what the Father has taught me." (John 8:28)

"'But I, when I am lifted up (hypsoō) from the earth, will draw all men to myself.' He said this to show the kind of death he was going to die." (John 12:32-33)

John speaks of Jesus' glorification in a way that includes the crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension as a single event.

"Up to that time the Spirit had not been given, since Jesus had not yet been glorified (doxazō)." (John 7:39b)

"Only after Jesus was glorified (doxazō) did they realize that these things had been written about him and that they had done these things to him." (John 12:16b)

"Isaiah said this because he saw Jesus' glory (doxa) and spoke about him." (John 12:41)

To the men on the road to Emmaus, Jesus explained the Scriptures and then said:

"Did not the Christ have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?" (Luke 24:26)

The Glorious Kingdom in Jesus' Darkest Hours

It is easy to see the Glorious Kingdom in Jesus' resurrection and ascension, but harder to see it in the crucifixion. Yet, at least five times during Jesus' darkest hours of trial and crucifixion we see references to the Glorious Kingdom.

1. Before the Sanhedrin. First, is Jesus' clear reference to Daniel's prophecy of the Son of Man before the High Priest Caiaphas (that we examined in Lesson 2 and will revisit in Lesson 6).

"I say to all of you: In the future you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of the Mighty One and coming on the clouds of heaven." Matthew 26:64

Jesus knows they will not believe him, but he keeps his eyes steadfastly on the Kingdom that will be ushered in at the Last Days.

Jesus is mocked as king, both by the Jewish soldiers and later by the Romans. But that does not change the truth that Jesus is indeed King. Men can reject him, but the glorified Jesus has the final word.

2. Before Pilate. Next, in Jesus' strange conversation with Pilate we see the Glorious Kingdom. Pilate begins by asking him about the Sanhedrin's charge that he claims to be a king

"Are you the King of the Jews?"

Jesus does not answer directly, but explains,

"'My kingdom is not of this world. If my kingdom were of this world, my servants would have been fighting, that I might not be delivered over to the Jews. But my kingdom is not from the world.'
Then Pilate said to him, 'So you are a king?'
Jesus answered, 'You say that I am a king. For this purpose I was born and for this purpose I have come into the world -- to bear witness to the truth....'" (John 18:33-37)

Pilate is a minor servant of the Roman Emperor. But the One who stands before him is the Ruler of the Glorious Kingdom that will never pass away. And it's clear that Jesus, knowing he will die, has not lost sight of this enduring Kingdom.

3. Placard on the center cross. The third instance is the sign in three languages that Pilate orders to be affixed to the cross. I think it represents both Pilate's admiration for Jesus (even though he doesn't believe him), and his distaste for the pretentions of the Jewish leaders, who will see it as claiming that their king is being crucified.

"Pilate also wrote an inscription and put it on the cross. It read, 'Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews.'" (John 19:19)

The Jewish leaders protest, but Pilate is steadfast. The Kingdom is proclaimed even amidst the horrors of Golgotha.

4. Thief on the cross. The fourth glimpse of the Glorious Kingdom takes place on the cross. One of the thieves who previously cursed him, comes to a realization of just who Jesus is, and utters these remarkable words that link glory with the Kingdom:

"'Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.'
Jesus answered him, 'I tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise.'" (Luke 23:42-43)

Even as he is dying, Jesus is fully aware that he is the King. He sees Paradise just around the corner now. Our English word "paradise" is a transliteration of the Greek word used here -- paradeisos -- and that comes from an Old Persian word pairidaeza, "enclosure." In the Greek Septuagint translation of the Old Testament the word is used especially for the Garden of God in the creation story (Genesis 2:8-10, 16, etc.), and this translation moves the word from secular parks to the sacred Garden of God. Judaism of Jesus' day equated Paradise with the New Jerusalem, and saw it as the present abode of the souls of the departed patriarchs, the elect, and the righteous. Jesus uses the word to denote "a transcendent place of blessedness, paradise."[51] Paradise is another word for referring to the Glorious Kingdom where God reigns.

5. This man was the Son of God. The final glimpse is by the centurion who has supervised the crucifixion exclaims on Jesus' death. Over the six hours Jesus is on the cross, this man has witnessed darkness and rolling earthquakes, the bitterness of man and the forgiveness of Jesus towards his tormentors.

"When the centurion and those who were with him, keeping watch over Jesus, saw the earthquake and what took place, they were filled with awe and said, 'Truly this was the Son of God!' (Matthew 27:54)

Though the centurion probably didn't know what he was really saying, "Son of God" is a Jewish messianic term for the coming Davidic King who will save his people.

The blackness on Golgotha in nearly complete, but even there the light of the Glorious Kingdom shines in the most remarkable and unexpected ways.

Q3. How is Jesus' glory displayed in his trial and crucifixion? In his resurrection? How do you think the thief on the cross and the centurion supervising the crucifixion could see his glory? Why is God's glory often seen in the midst of suffering?
http://www.joyfulheart.com/forums/topic/1704-q3-glory-and-crucifixion/

Authority, Glory, and Sovereign Power

Christ's Kingly Authority on Earth

As we are considering Jesus' glory, we also need to see his kingly authority in the Glorious Kingdom. Daniel's prophecy mentions authority in the midst of the Son of Man's glory and kingdom.

"He was given authority, glory and sovereign power;
all peoples, nations and men of every language worshiped him.
His dominion is an everlasting dominion that will not pass away,
and his kingdom is one that will never be destroyed." (Daniel 7:14)

Indeed, the glory in Jesus' miracles lies in his authority.

It is clear from the Gospels that Jesus possesses all authority when he is in the flesh, not just later after he is glorified. Here are a few examples:

"But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins" -- he then said to the paralytic -- 'Rise, pick up your bed and go home.'" (Matthew 9:6)

 "The Father loves the Son and has placed everything in his hands." (John 3:35)

"The Father judges no one, but has entrusted all judgment to the Son, that all may honor the Son just as they honor the Father." (John 5:22-23a)

"Jesus knew that the Father had put all things under his power, and that he had come from God and was returning to God." (John 13:3)

"You granted him authority over all people that he might give eternal life to all those you have given him." (John 17:2)

"All things have been committed to me by my Father. No one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and those to whom the Son chooses to reveal him." (Matthew 11:27; Luke 10:22)

"Then Jesus came to them and said, 'All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.'" (Matthew 28:18)

Jesus Delegates His Authority

Jesus delegates this authority as well. For example, he gives the twelve apostles authority.

"He called his twelve disciples to him and gave them authority to drive out evil spirits and to heal every disease and sickness." (Matthew 10:1)

But the authority isn't restricted to the Twelve only. To the 70 or 72 whom he sends out two by two, he commands them to go to each village.

"Heal the sick who are there and tell them, 'The kingdom of God is near you.'" (Luke 10:9)

They come back for their debriefing full of stories of their exploits.

"The seventy-two returned with joy and said, 'Lord, even the demons submit to us in your name.'
He replied, '... I have given you authority to trample on snakes and scorpions and to overcome all the power of the enemy; nothing will harm you. However, do not rejoice that the spirits submit to you, but rejoice that your names are written in heaven.'" (Luke 10:17-19)

The authority is in the Name of Jesus, which the disciples use in faith.

"Silver or gold I do not have, but what I have I give you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, walk." (Acts 3:6)

Since then, the world has never been the same, because men and women of faith have been equipped with the Name. For more on this delegated authority and its Christ-glory see Lesson 5.

The Glorious Kingdom was clearly seen in Jesus' life and ministry -- in his miracles, his transfiguration, his crucifixion, his resurrection, his ascension, and in his Kingdom authority. We'll consider the revelation of Jesus' glory in his Second Coming in Lesson 6.

The phrase "kingdom authority" is used in Jack Hayford's classic praise chorus, "Majesty." If you know the song, sing it as you close this lesson.

Majesty, worship His majesty
Unto Jesus be all glory, honor and praise.
Majesty, Kingdom authority,
Flow from His throne unto His own
His anthem raise.

So exalt, lift up on high the name of Jesus.
Magnify, come glorify Christ Jesus the King.

Majesty, worship His majesty,
Jesus who died, now glorified
King of all kings.[52]

Q4. According to Daniel 7:14, what is the extent of the Son of Man's authority? Of his glory? How is the use of Jesus' name in prayer and command a form of delegating his power? How much power do we have in Jesus' name? What limits the exercise of this power? http://www.joyfulheart.com/forums/topic/1705-q4-jesus-authority/

Lessons for Disciples

The Glorious Kingdom: A Disciple's Guide to Kingdom Glory and Authority, by Dr. Ralph F. Wilson
Available in PDF and Kindle formats

We've covered a lot of ground seeing how Jesus' glory and authority are revealed in his life an ministry. Let's review:

  1. Since Christ existed prior to the creation of the world, and participated in the creation, he has had glory with the Father "before the world began."
  2. Christ's birth was announced by glorious angels at Bethlehem.
  3. Jesus' glory is seen in both his transfiguration and miracles.
  4. Jesus glory comes directly from the Father.
  5. Some of Jesus' disciples -- and the thief on the cross -- expect him to come in glory, that is, with his glory and kingly authority no longer hidden.
  6. Jesus' crucifixion as a sacrifice for the sins of many also manifests his glory (fulfilling Isaiah 52:13), along with his resurrection.
  7. Jesus' glorious kingship is visible in Jesus' darkest hours before the Sanhedrin and Pilate, as well as by the placard placed on his cross, by the thief on the cross, and by the centurion overseeing Jesus' crucifixion.
  8. Jesus' kingly authority and glory are prophesied in Daniel 7:14. All things are under his authority -- including the ability to judge and to forgive sin.
  9. Jesus delegates his kingly authority to his disciples -- then and now -- by giving them the right to use his Name.

Throughout Jesus' life we see the Glorious Kingdom. In the next lesson we'll examine how Jesus' glory changes us.

Prayer

Thank you, Father, for displaying your glory in Jesus your Son. Jesus, thank you for the glimpses of your power and Kingdom. Thank you for leaving your glory to come to earth to save us. Thank you for the glory of You giving your life for us. In Your holy name, I pray. Amen.

Key Verses

"The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth." (John 1:14)

"I have brought you glory on earth by completing the work you gave me to do. And now, Father, glorify me in your presence with the glory I had with you before the world began." (John 17:4-5)

"An angel of the Lord appeared to them,
and the glory of the Lord shone around them,
and they were terrified." (Luke 2:9)

"There he was transfigured before them. His face shone like the sun, and his clothes became as white as the light. Just then there appeared before them Moses and Elijah, talking with Jesus.... While he was still speaking, a bright cloud enveloped them, and a voice from the cloud said, 'This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased. Listen to him!'" (Matthew 17:2-3, 5)

"See, my servant will act wisely;
he will be raised and lifted up and highly exalted."
(Isaiah 52:13)

"Did not the Christ have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?" (Luke 24:26)

"'Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.'

Jesus answered him, 'I tell you the truth, today you will be with me in paradise.'" (Luke 23:42-43)

"Then Jesus came to them and said, 'All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.'" (Matthew 28:18)

End Notes

[43] "Miraculous signs" (NIV), "signs" (NRSV, ESV), "miracles" (KJV) is the plural of sēmeion, "sign, an event that is an indication or confirmation of intervention by transcendent powers, miracle, portent" (Sēmeion, BDAG 920, 2a). A "portent" in English is "something that foreshadows a coming event.... prophetic indication or significance" (Merriam-Webster's 11th Collegiate Dictionary, 2003).

[44] "Revealed" (NIV, NRSV), "manifested" (ESV, KJV) is phaneroō, "to cause to become visible, reveal, expose publicly," and here the similar idea of, "to cause to become known, disclose, show, make known." (BDAG 1048, 2).

[45] You may detect here a bit of my view of Irresistible Grace, which is one of the five pillars of five-point TULIP Calvinism.

[46] See "Glory" and "Glorify" in John's Gospel, Appendix 6 in my book, John's Gospel: A Discipleship Journey with Jesus. http://www.jesuswalk.com/john/appendix_6.htm

[47] Glory is particularly associated with the Son of Man because of the passage in Daniel: "One like a son of man ... was given authority, glory and sovereign power" (Daniel 7:13-14).

[48] John 7:39; 12:16, 23; 13:31-32; 17:1.

[49] Sphodra, "very much, exceedingly" (Liddell-Scott, Lexicon).

[50] Paul says something similar: "Therefore God exalted him to the highest place (hyperypsoō) and gave him the name that is above every name...." (Philippians 2:9). Hyperypsoō means, "to raise to a high point of honor, raise, exalt" (BDAG 1034, 1).

[51] Paradeisos, BDAG 761, 2.  I. Howard Marshall, Commentary on Luke (New International Greek Testament Commentary; Eerdmans, 1978), p. 872-873. Joachim Jeremias, paradeisos, TDNT 5:765-773.

[52] Jack Hayford, "Majesty," ©1981 Rocksmith Music.


Copyright © 1985-2017, Ralph F. Wilson. <pastor@joyfulheart.com> All rights reserved. A single copy of this article is free. Do not put this on a website. See legal, copyright, and reprint information.

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